It appears the minimal word route seemed to have been a successful method in portraying the excitement of our first day of production. The pictures posted hopefully gave you a good idea not only of how lively June 8th was but also what our little film is going to look like. This time, as I walk you through Production Day 2, I thought it would be interesting to use even fewer words in explaining the day. So, instead of the typical full-sentence format, I present to you haikus from Day 2; a few 17-syllabulled poems to walk you through our final day of shooting. Hopefully, this will make the reading experience just slightly different. But in a good way.

If you haven’t yet, please make sure you see the post about Production Day 1 (http://projectspacesquid.com/2010/06/production-day-1-a-photo-essay-in-two-parts/). It isn’t a required pre-requisite to reading or understanding this particular post, but you’d be missing some awesome pictures from June 8th.

Once again, photo credit goes to the talented Sam Green (http://dd.ourvfs.com/dd13sam/wordpress/).

Day 2 – June 9th

Prosthetic white arms / Tearing apart at the seams / Fake blood everywhere

Moving onto legs / Just ask makeup artist Nikki / Ripping them is fun

Pulled into shadows / Norrys fighting for his life / My favorite shot

Breaking off his limbs / One leg following one arm / James is a good sport

Detectives hunting / Tim, Steven and Adrian/ Only green screen shot

Dim lighting all day / Made interesting pictures / Everyone moody

That’s all she wrote, or in this case, took pictures of. I’m sure the haiku format kept you riveted throughout.

Shooting wrapped shortly after; not just on The Rats in the Walls but for all of Project Space Squid. We said thank-you to the cast and crew and began taking down the set and packing up the equipment. It was certainly a bitter-sweet moment. While we had completed shooting our film, we had also just wrapped one of our most important and exciting experiences at VFS.

As the euphoria of the last two days set in, we prepared ourselves for the post-production phase. While before it was costumes, make-up and actors that consumed all of our time, it would now be editors, sound designers and composers we would need to chase after. It will be twice as laborious and all kinds of frustrations will surface. But for now, we smile and enjoy the fruits of our labour. Regardless of how ripe they may be.

See you next time!